Category Archives: Investment Opportunities

Room to grow in Huron East

It’s time to party…..

Seaforth TD Canada Trust Branch Celebrates 125 Years

The Town of Seaforth, founded in 1875, is built on the foundation of a strong community that celebrates its built heritage and makes Seaforth home to many. One such historic landmark, the Seaforth TD Canada Trust Branch, is excited to announce that it will be celebrating its 125th Anniversary Friday, July 20th, 2018 and you’re invited!

Join us as we pay tribute to our shared history with our customers and the Seaforth community, by unveiling a historic mural showing appreciation for 125 years and counting.

Everyone is welcome. Details below.

What: TD Canada Trust Seaforth branch celebrates its 125th Anniversary
When: Friday, July 20th, 2018 at 11:00am – 3:00pm
Where: 56 Main Street South, Seaforth, ON
Media photo opp: Media are invited to take photos of the celebration; a historic mural of the Seaforth community from 125 years ago when the TD branch first opened its doors

Part of our history……

Picture of the 1859 Toronto Dominion Bank building prior to demolition and replacement of current building. For a full history, read below;

TD Canada Trust is a member of the Award Winning Business Improvement Area

What’s in store for Rural Ontario’s future?

The FUTURE continues to shine brightly for the Village of Brussels for 2018.

Municipality of Huron East, Huron County 

Huron East’s Economic Development Officer and Community Futures Huron volunteer, Jan Hawley is smiling a lot these days—for many reasons.  Following three successful “Win This Space” competitions and the Municipality of Huron East’s immensely positive presence at the recent International Plowing Match, the Village of Brussels continues on an upswing with another new business arriving in town with the promise of more to come.

“This federally-funded program has had a presence in Huron East for nearly a quarter of a century through the Community Futures offices of the Huron Business Development Corporation in Downtown Seaforth”, Hawley reports. “However, when the board made a decision to move its offices last year, it triggered an extensive search throughout Huron County for the newly branded “Community Futures Huron” with the location landing in Downtown Brussels.” says Hawley, “And I couldn’t be happier.”

“Momentum is building in the village,” she goes on, “with several additions to its business district—the opening of new ventures Fresh Petals, JD & Companythe Federal Development Community Futures operation, as well as the opening of the unique multi-faceted site, Brussels Four Winds Wedding & Event Barn later this spring.  Additional people living and working in a community are always good for business, and with new enterprise comes renovated and upgraded storefronts.”

Community Futures Huron Staff

(L to R) Natasha Mahon, Heather Little, Paul Nichol, Brenda McGregor, Lisa Houthuyzen

Tina Heathers

Community Futures Huron General Manager Paul Nichol is also looking forward to moving the office and staff to Brussels and to providing the usual excellent assistance entrepreneurs have come to expect.  “In addition to business growth and community revitalization,” states Nichol, “we’ll be focusing on management advice and mentoring to owners, provision of commercial loans, and support to local economic development projects.  We have a new name and a new location, but we’ll continue to offer the same valuable service we have for 25 years.”

Community Futures Huron is particularly excited about a new undertaking—the restoration of two historic mills,” he goes on, “one at Gorrie and the other being Logan’s Mill in Brussels.”

“We’re working with the Maitland Valley Conservation Authority on these projects, which will involve renovation and re-purposing of the mill sites, two of only four remaining of the 68 mills once located along the Maitland River.”

The Management Board of Brussels’ Medical-Dental Centre is particularly happy about soon having the remaining half of the centre’s upper floor occupied and to be welcoming new people to the village’s workforce.  Board Chair Mary Stretton foresees positive spin-offs for the village from the Community Futures relocation, which she is pleased to announce completely fills the centre.

And as of January 2018, Barb Terpstra, proprietor of Fresh Petals, will be offering original and traditional floral bouquets and arrangements, not only for weddings booked at the Four Winds Wedding & Event Barnbut also for locals, who wish to brighten someone’s day.

Jackie deWit, winner of the 3rd annual Huron East Win This Space competition and her JD & Company has already settled into her newly renovated storefront and is now offering village and area residents with exceptional non-toxic household products and commodities by bringing her ‘green’ business to main street Brussels.

“Brussels is booming” saga continues!

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Written by Carolyn Parks Mintz for the Municipality of Huron East

 

 

Contact: Jan Hawley  Economic Development Officer                           

Municipality of Huron East ~ Seaforth, Ontario

Officer: 519.527.0160 Cell: 519.525.7677

jhawley@huroneast.com 

Re-birth of Historic Downtown Brussels…

Change is in the Air……

“Brussels Four Winds Barn – Wedding, Market and Events Centre”

Over the years, the Village of Brussels has made strides to revitalize its historic downtown. With support from the Municipality of Huron East, local community and business groups and numerous student-lead programs lead by the Universities of Guelph and Waterloo, this quaint rural Ontario village is finally starting to show signs of a come-back.

This can be seen in the attractive streetscape and wall murals lining its downtown, the re-birth of the Brussels Public School, the renovation of its cherished Carnegie Library, and the development of walking trails that wind along its tree-lined streets and scenic waterfront.

The latest undertaking is the construction of the Brussels Four Winds Wedding and Event Barn: a visionary, re-purposing project that will incorporate a vintage barn within a multi-functional site hosting community events, weddings, celebrations, bakery and year-round farmers’ market, while providing a venue for the collection of unique shops.

The talk of ‘barn re-purposing’ may beg the question: Does a barn cease to be a barn when it no longer shelters livestock, when haylofts are empty, or when its threshing floor is silent? Perhaps. 
Nevertheless, this structure’s massive, hand-hewn, rock-elm timbers have made the journey to their new home, and will receive a renewed lease on life.Its arrival to downtown Brussels begins another chapter in this local heritage barn’s history.

Built by Alexander Stewart in 1862, the 57’ by 80’ “Wheeler Barn,” as it is known locally, has withstood severe weather, and many years of heavy use, while faithfully serving generations of Stewart and Wheeler homestead families for over 150 years. Once a vital structure, it was now standing unused; it was deteriorating, a testament to the agricultural history of the region, and to an industry much changed.
Enter…..Bryan Morton. While chatting with local property owner and businesswoman Barbara Terpstra, the retired farmer contemplated the notion of moving an old barn to downtown Brussels—and the rest is soon to be history.

Herman Terpstra donated the barn, and skilled Mennonite work crews led by Cleeson and Abram Martin were marshalled. Locals pitched in to arrange food for workers, and Bryan Morton and Project Coordinator Herb Jacobs numbered, catalogued and tagged each piece of timber. The barn was disassembled, new foundations poured, and the former Wheeler Barn was transported piece by piece to its new location, adjacent to the historic Brussels Carnegie Library. 
Its reconstruction has been exciting to watch, and the merging of past and future has indeed been heartwarming to all.This “old-new bank barn” will integrate modern insulation, lighting, and renovations with original barn board, granite stonework, foundation rubble stone, and items such as a vintage curry comb box and a working windmill. The structure will even feature a piece of concrete reading “S.W. 1922” recognizing Stanley Wheeler, who took over the farm from his father in 1919, a tradition handed down by many homesteaders over the years.
Weather vanes will adorn the top of four cupolas perched on the British Columbia red cedar shingled roof of the Four Winds centre, aptly named given that it is sure to draw visitors and shoppers from all directions. This new structure’s design complements the existing Carnegie Library in material and architectural detail, and will not interfere with sight lines to the building’s impressive façade and roofline.

The Four Winds development is a perfect fit for the soon-to-be-implemented Brussels Community Improvement Plan, which will facilitate restoration of historic storefronts along its main street.

Refurbishment of 19th century structures has proven to be an important aspect of archi-tourism, together with renewed economic development. As respected heritage restoration specialist, Dr. Christopher Cooper maintains, “Quaint never goes out of style!” 

 “I have a great fondness for timber-frame barns, and they are rapidly disappearing, being torn down or falling down,” says Bryan Morton. “When I was farming, I was too busy to participate in the community, but it is now time to give back. Providing Brussels with one of my favourite pieces of function and form, just seemed in order.”

 The “Wheeler Barn” therefore remains a barn, but a barn with a new purpose.

To be continued……

For more information contact: Jan Hawley, Economic Development Officer – Municipality of Huron East 519.527.0160

Written for the Municipality of Huron East in collaboration with: Carolyn Parks Mintz, Kylie Hendriks, & Jan Hawley

Photography & Conceptual Drawings prepared by: Lynne Moreland – Westcoast Photography, Dr. Christopher Cooper, Edifice Guild & Atelier and Herb Jacobs, Brussels Four Winds Project Coordinator